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It is a pleasure an honor to serve as one of many who help lead this dynamic and productive section of the American Sociological Association (ASA). The Section on Communication and Information Technologies (CITASA) is home to some of the most renowned experts in the field. We are an interdisciplinary and international group of researchers that in the best of the sociological traditions study the role of information and communication technologies on social change, patterns of social interaction and collective action. The scope of our intellectual and research interests ranges from studies of identity, social networks, interpersonal interaction, the diffusion of information, and human-computer interaction, to studies of community, institutional and societal changes. Our section reflects the growing interest in sociology of communications and Information Technologies. 

The section membership has increased steadily in recent years and new members are always welcome to join. 
Our section is diverse including established sociologists working in Sociology and other interdisciplinary academic departments, sociologists working in the private and public sector and a large group of graduate students that are conducting new and innovative studies on the social aspects of Information and Communication Technologies. Our section is open to any scholarship that improves our understanding of the adoption, use and implications of communication and information technologies. Excellent papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the ASA are selected to be published in a special issue of Information, Communication and Society. If you are not a member, I invite you to join our group and contribute to the discipline.
 
 
Sincerely
Gustavo S. Mesch, Chair
Communication and Information Technologies Section
American Sociological Association
 
 
Gustavo S. Mesch is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Haifa, Israel. He received his Ph.D. from the Ohio State University in sociology. His research interests focus on the relationship between new information and communication technologies, social networks, and social inequalities.